DOI

  • Eleni Patsoula
  • Annita Vakali
  • Georgios Balatsos
  • Danai Pervanidou
  • Stavroula Beleri
  • Nikolaos Tegos
  • Agoritsa Baka
  • Gregory Spanakos
  • Theano Georgakopoulou
  • Persefoni Tserkezou
  • Wim Van Bortel
  • Herve Zeller
  • Panagiotis Menounos
  • Jenny Kremastinou
  • Christos Hadjichristodoulou

Background of the Study. Following a large West Nile virus (WNV) epidemic in Northern Greece in 2010, an active mosquito surveillance system was implemented, for a 3-year period (2011, 2012, and 2013). Description of the Study Site and Methodology. Using mainly CO2 mosquito traps, mosquito collections were performed. Samples were pooled by date of collection, location, and species and examined for the presence of WNV. Results. Positive pools were detected in different areas of the country. In 2010, MIR and MLE values of 1.92 (95% CI: 0.00-4.57) and 2.30 (95% CI: 0.38-7.49) were calculated for the Serres Regional Unit in Central Macedonia Region. In 2011, the highest MIR value of 3.71(95% CI: 1.52-5.91) was recorded in the Regions of Central Greece and Thessaly. In 2012, MIR and MLE values for the whole country were 2.03 (95% CI: 1.73-2.33) and 2.15 (95% CI: 1.86-2.48), respectively, for Cx. pipiens. In 2013, in the Regional Unit of Attica, the one outbreak epicenter, MIR and MLE values for Cx. pipiens were 10.75 (95% CI: 7.52-13.99) and 15.76 (95% CI: 11.66-20.65), respectively. Significance of Results/Conclusions. The contribution of a mosquito-based surveillance system targeting WNV transmission is highlighted through the obtained data, as in most regions positive mosquito pools were detected prior to the date of symptom onset of human cases. Dissemination of the results on time to Public Health Authorities resulted in planning and application of public health interventions in local level.

Originele taal-2Engels
TijdschriftBioMed Research International
Volume2016
Pagina's (van-tot)2450682
ISSN2314-6133
DOI's
StatusGepubliceerd - 2016
Extern gepubliceerdJa

ID: 1955898